Walt and Mary’s

We left Annapolis Monday heading S.  Picked up our varnish from Mickey and Lil on Carpe’ Diem and motored out of Back Creek into the Severn and the Bay. We sailed for the morn under a Yankee going about 6 kts. Winds were brisk but they slowly died as the day wore on and we ended up motoring into Solomons.

We kind of enjoy Solomons and stayed two nights there picking up an expensive mooring. I’m just tired of the mud in the Chesapeake so the mooring was worth it to us. Wed was to be a good sailing day and it was almost. Again we put up the sails and sailed half of the way to Reedville. We had met Walt and Mary at an SSCA gam in the Rhode River; they have a Westsail 32 a sistership of our last boat and related to our current one. During the course of the gam we talked w/ them about being a mail drop. They had said no problem and even offered us a slip at their house should we make it there. Well; with that kind of offer – we would make it there.

Sailing from Solomons was; as W/ likes to say, kind of pleasant. We ended up doing close to 6 kts under mainsail alone. We tried full sails and then it was simply easiest to leave the main up and if the winds slacked a bit put out the Yankee. Reedville is kind of a weird place. Weird good. There is a Menhaden fish processing plant, a couple of restaurants, a few B and B’s, a really nice Maritime Museum and two great places to anchor. But the guides suggest often skipping it because of the odors coming of the fish processing plant. W/ said “How bad can it be”? On the way in traveling around some pound nets (fish traps) we first went through a mild area of odor thinking – well that’s not too bad; then we hit the big stuff. Oh – Oh! Fortunately we passed through the river of odor in the wind and slowly made our way into Reedville. Mary had said to call before you get into Reedville as the cell phone coverage in there is not great.

We began calling when we made it S of the Potomac but the cell phone coverage in Virginia on the Chesapeake isn’t great at all. After trying close to 100 times (yeah – I may be exaggerating a bit) the only option was to stop at a dock and call. We stopped at the first dock in town at the end of the only main street. The restaurant was now only open weekends, the marina was connected to the restaurant and so I began hiking down Main St to find a place that had a landline  and the owners would be kind enough to let me make a local call. After what seemed like hours (actually maybe 10 minutes) I found a restaurant that wasn’t open but had people in there and they were kind enough to let me use the phone.

I called and received excellent directions, go back a bit, turn to stb, past the water tower, past the green boat w/ the wood like mast,

Our Boats

Our Boats

past the Hinkley, and Walt will be waiting on the dock. They’ve already swung their boat around to the side. And what joy seeing Walt on the dock ready to catch lines. We tied Elysium up and with the offer of power to the boat, and warm showers inside their home we were happy sailors. Yet there was more. After warming up in the shower they said that hourdouvs would be at 6 and we would eat at 7!  What hospitality!  Had we died and gone to heaven?  So being the good guest all we had to do was take them up on it.

Mary and Walt

Mary and Walt

Ok, Sharing a hot meal with other sailors and telling tall tales is one of cruising’s most important rules. So we ate some good food, shared some good stories and they offered the house to us as we needed. There was some wx coming in and boy was the NWS correct this time. The following day they had some errands in the am but gave us the key to the house and we warmed up and did some internet updates in the am. They returned home and invited us to dinner….. again. Sweet. Obviously we accepted and W/ and Mary began to discuss how they would arrange the evening. Friends of Walt’s Mary’s too were invited so we would meet some other locals. Well; almost.

The town like most communities are divided into groups. In this county of about 20k there are two groups of people; the “Born Here” and the “Come Here”. Walt likes to joke that the founder of Reedville was himself a “Come Here” but that really doesn’t effect any of the feelings of the born heres. So we met some more “Come Heres” and had a great evening yucking it up. There I discovered that Walt and Mary had an unfinished room and Walt was laying a floor. In my not so polite manner I invited myself to help him finish and our work time was to begin Friday promptly at 10 am.  That’s a working schedule I can live with.

We worked on the floor most of the day and when we had finished Walt and Mary gave us an automobile tour of the Reedville and the nearby area while we treated them to lunch. There we met some other cruisers, Jack and Zee on a Valiant 42 Kate. They were hanging in the anchorage till the Nor’ Easter blew through. That evening we attended a meet and greet at the Maritime Museum in Reedville.  Great fun. We met some other “Come Heres” and there was actually one or two “Born Heres”.  Funny how the Come Heres seem to always be the ones volunteering but I guess that is one of the best ways to get to know a community. They have a wood shop where they refurbish wooden boats, have small family boat building nights, women boat building weekends and the members that volunteer here get to use it too!  That’s my kind of place. Also they have a great model railroad that is called, “The Railroad that Never Was”.  It was a proposed RR that the ferry boats fought and so it never got off the ground. Funny now, none of the ferry boats are in existence anymore anyway. The Model RR is a 1920 era and all the models of the town are detailed to the homes and business that were in existence then. Cool.

High Water

High Water

The following day Walt and I put in a replacement door in the Pantry. We hung it but didn’t put the door knob on yet as there seemed to need to be some trimming and we didn’t have a hand planner. So I retired then from working any more on their great homestead.  All the while the wind was a blowing and the water kept rising and the temperature kept dropping. We actually turned on our diesel heater that really didn’t warm up the boat but it did take the cold out. In other words; we couldn’t run around in our tropical outfit.  That evening we had dinner; yeah, at the hospitality King and Queens again, with Jack and Z and the 4 of us.

The following day we were feeling like people on welfare so W/ offered to cook the evening meal and we had a great deal of comfort food; Goulash.  That with Wine, Beer, and an endless supply of tall tales made time fly by. One of the evenings we were really indulged in watching a current eposide of “Ugly Betty”. We hadn’t seen any of the last year’s and so they brought us basically up to date. The following day the Sun was to peak, the winds were to abate, the rain (almost freezing) was to go away and so too we were making plans to head S and prepare for going off shore to Bermuda.

Finally sunshine! Finally!  We spent the am cleaning up from four wet days on the boat and readying it for our

Walt N Mary's Visit

Walt N Mary's Visit

trip down the bay. And finally too; we were able to show Walt and Mary our home. They stopped by to help with the lines (and make sure we were really leaving 🙂  ) and they continued to make us feel good with numerous “Oooh’s and Awww’s” about how we had the boat.

We’ll sincerely miss Walt and Mary but as it seems to most sailors there’ll be another day of getting together. While we were there Walt was discussing another set of cruisers that were just there. They were there by car as their boat was in Trinadad”. Out of curiosity I asked if it was Terry and Barb. What a hoot! It was Terry and Barb from Windwhisperer. We met them in the Bahamas last winter (and who can forget W/ towing Barb in her dinghy backwards) and found out they were just here, going to the boat show and visiting.  Last year their boat sat where ours is now. So for sailors it’s a small world.

Fair Winds

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