Posts Tagged ‘Tisa’s Barefoot Bar’

Well…

Sunday, June 14th, 2015

Things are happening here, but the events are slow as walking a milkfish pond netting that tasty meal.

Fight the Wind Stitching the Main

Fight the Wind Stitching the Main

We’ve sewn up the mainsail and it now is 100%. The drifter/reacher is yet to do. For part of the sewing event W/ kept the main sail from flogging me to death while the wind blew. Due to excessive wind that days job was cut sort. The following day during a lull in the wind I finished the stitching using a Herringbone stitch. The herringbone is mostly for embroidery but I had read how effective it was in repairing stitching on sails and I really liked it.  The chafe was in a place that running the sail though our Sailrite machine would have been a lot of work. First pulling the sail off, then setting up the machine and finally folding the sail to run the 8 3″ stitches that I needed. After all that returning the sail to service. Thus I hand stitched it never needing to remove or reinstall the sail.  We’ll see how well the stitch holds on our next leg but I don’t foresee any problems.

We actually did a wee bit o’ tourist stuff.  Tehani – Li came into Samoa and with Carol and Phil we went to one of the premier restaurants; Tisa’s Barefoot Bar, for a delightful and not cheap Samoan feast.  We arrived early on the local bus saving a few bucks with transportation and spending more than what we saved on drinks. Oh well; penny wise and pound foolish often seems to be the American way.

Happy Masticator

Happy Masticator

We sat down to a meal with Banana leaves as plates and watched as they uncovered the above ground pit. Thanks to all our time in Penhryn eating with my fingers now was not a problem. The owner explained to us how they prepare and cook the food. Depending on the amount of food and what is being cooked, from start to finish

Uncovering the food.

Uncovering the food.

takes about two days and for most of Samoans this is a Sunday family / community  event.  There is no pit and all of the cooking is done above ground.  They build a fire heating hot rocks, then layer the rocks with food and more rocks building up the mound. Finally they cover the entire mound with various leave trapping in all the moisture. No moisture must be seen to escape. The owner informed us several times that no matter what event happens on the island, tsunami, hurricane, fires, etc. they will always have food and be well fed. Westerners like to call this subsistence living but I think the better word is sustainable. She actually said she believes the west (that is our country)  to be in more danger of food shortages than the Samoans are. Any day Samoans can go pick what they need from the island, swim and gather from the sea, and they will have plenty. And we did have plenty; from Octopus, prawns, lamb, pork, turkey, breadfruit, squash, and topped off with Kava. I didn’t have any kava not wishing to apply a neuro toxin to my mouth. Yeah, I missed out but there will be other chances.

Saturday we picked up some goodies at the Post Office.  The correct plumbing supplies arrived from McMaster-Carr and our Alternator arrived from Great Water – finally. I had to email Great-Water a couple of times but finally when I used the website to contact them they responded immediately. I was informed that it appears the first alternator that was shipped has gone missing and they would send another. Ok, I was a little concerned and said the alternator needed to be in Hawaii by Friday to be on the plane here Sat.  I never thought it would go so smoothly and yet having contacted them Sunday, received an email Monday, replied Monday that yes I want the alternator and what needed to happen to get it here promptly. Finally all went well. When we were at the post so was our alternator.  Now that project can begin.

Rainmaker doing it's Job

Rainmaker doing it's Job

Back at the boat the weather was beginning to deteriorate. In our almost 7 years of cruising this has been continuously the worst weather we’ve had. We’ve  now  been in American Samoa a little over 6 weeks we’ve had less than 10 nice days. Often in those 10 days there have even been periods of intense rain.  As we returned to the boat we barely beat another rain shower and from then on the winds started to increase up to gale force. This being in the harbor. In the gusts the boat would heel over 5º.  And so we mostly sat on the boat and entertained ourselves. W/ invited Mary (from sv Hot Spur) over for Scrabble – Mary scored a 150 pt word – you know who won 🙂 . I played chess online with FICS, we did puzzles on the iPad, played FreeCell, and read on the Kindles.  Two days later the weather was abating and I was able to again do work on our engine issue.

Temperature Sensor Shorts on Plumbing

Temperature Sensor Shorts on Plumbing

In Tahiti I had made a change to our cooling system when we had to replace our thermostat. I had raised the plumbing so the fresh water cooling tube could not short out the temp  sensor on the engine.  Now I don’t know if this issue is effecting the clicking I hear when the water pump is running but I did want to return the plumbing to it’s normal position. To complete that project I needed to pull the sensor, put the elbow in place and put it back together. As I cruise and do a greater amount of engine work myself I find I respect mechanics more and more. For the most part there is never an easy time working on the

New Sensor Elbow

New Sensor Elbow

engine. Here I thought I  would unscrew the fitting, screw in the elbow and then add the sensor.  To accomplish this simple task, to screw in the elbow I discovered that one of the marinized brackets was in the way eliminating a complete rotation of the elbow. I had to remove that bracket and that entailed removing two other brackets, one holding the transmission, oil cooler, the other controls the cable for the shifter.  Almost 3 hours later I was finished with all items restored to their original position.  I hope, I hope, I hope …. this solves the riddle.

Go Slow
Sail Far
Stay Long

Share