Posts Tagged ‘Paint’

Cartag YEAH na!

Monday, January 10th, 2011

Well we’ve been here over a week now. Settling in. We’re having “Elvis” paint the engine. We’ve walked the walled city. We’ve eaten at several restaurants, we have a scheduled for a Dermatologist and we went swimming in a Volcano.

Well not really swimming. More like floating. Jeri on Peking organized a tour to the Volcano, $30 US / person and we signed up. We traveled in a new minivan (for me mini isn’t all it’s cracked up to be) and had Alex as an English speaking tour guide. We meandered through the city a bit with Alex telling us of various neighborhoods and how the growth has occurred and tidbits  of the history of Colombia; political as well as long past.

We went through a toll booth and even passed the first speed trap I’ve seen since in the US.  Just as in the US, autos coming the other direction flashed their lights as a warning.  Things that work just seem to be universal. We turned off the highway and went up a road to the mud volcano. The road had just recently been paved and wasn’t yet finished. There we passed some small Tiendas and received instructions on the experience.

Mud Volcano, Colombia

Mud Volcano, Colombia

Most of us had worn a bathing suit under but those that didn’t went to change. We left our shoes at the bottom and climbed the stairs to the top making sure to hang on to the hand rail as the steps

Mud & Me

Mud & Me

were covered in the mud from people descending. Any moisture on the steps and they too were a bit slippery. At the top we watched as people entered the mud backwards and one of the massagers (people working in the bath’s for tips) laid you on your back and then slowly covered you with “MUD”. It wasn’t an unpleasant experience. The mud was slick and barely warm; most definitely not cold. Once covered from head to toe he massaged the legs, torso, face and arms (all in a couple of minutes – not nearly long enough) then he gently pushed you as you floated to another who rolled you over and massaged the back side. You could hang on to a wooden lattice work on the sides to keep your face out of the water. After a few more minutes you were rolled back over and he pushed your feet under you so you could hang upright in the mud.

Hang is the best word to describe it. The mud had so much material that you floated about chest high. Just for fun I slowly tried to dunk W/ (she was aware of it) and I couldn’t get her shoulders below the surface. I kept rising out of the mud.  One group of the tour, Fay, commented that she couldn’t seem to find the bottom!  We all laughed at that as we had understood the bottom was over a 1,000 ft deep!  All of us floated in the mud for about 30 minutes; slowly moving around, sometimes our body getting out of a vertical plane and then our feet would come floating to the surface. The best way to get upright was to have some assistance in pushing your legs back under you or balling up, and rotating slightly and getting your legs under you; then projecting them back down.

As we began to exit we paused at the ledge and scraped the gobs of mud off of us and back into the Volcano. Of course as legend goes the bath is good for “curing” any skin issues you might have as well as removing years of age.  Now I know I look 40 again!

After being washed off by another in the fresh water lake we cooled off with some local drink and food. We tried their equivalent of the Egg McMuffin; without the Muffin, ( I wasn’t fond of this) and I had up a fruit salad which was IMHO; excellent (cost approx $2.25).

We boarded the bus and went back through a small community that excelled in making cast nets

Good Luck!  Dark are is all fingerlings.

Good Luck! Dark are is all fingerlings.

and fishing. Megan and Becca (another two on the tour) tried their hand at throwing the net but they would have been on an extended diet if this would have been their life’s work as they both came up empty handed. This is one place the lake exits to the sea over a small dam and the fingerlings were so abundant here they literally  turned the water black. The dark area in the photo is a mass of fingerlings. The larger fish come to feed on the smaller with the Colombian’s hoping to feed on the lager fish!

Back at the boat we did what all good folk do at the end of a day’s work – we rested.

In the Walled City, Cartagena

In the Walled City, Cartagena

The walking tour was self guided and we had started with Jeri as our tour guide on Peking ( a beautiful Diesel Duck Motor Yacht).  She had bought a book All Cartagena De Indias (which ironically isn’t even available in the US) and there we followed Jeri like good

An Artist; He moves, he lives!

An Artist; He moves, he lives!

puppies as she led us through the “Walled City”.  Once upon a time Cartagena  had been referred to as the Stone Playground. Even though this was  a tour we spent more time simply gawking as we walked through the city. We tasted some of the local “sweet” fare that people were selling outside the courtyard, we toured the “Gold Museum”, we found a restaurant  that had mostly locals eating in and thus we figured it would be good and reasonable!  It was both.  We ended another day totally exhausted and ready to count sheep.

I seem to just stack too much life into too small a space. Two big events in one week!  What’s happening?  In between the tours we had contracted with a local mechanic (Elvis) to paint the engine. All day Elvis and Alfonso labored to clean the oil off the engine, sand lightly any

New Engine? Not!

New Engine? Not!

rust ( I wish they would have just used Ospho), primed the engine and then paint it. In the states they would have been hung by some branch of our government.  Elvis had a small low pressure paint sprayer that he  had cut a hose off of the pressure end. Then he and Alfonso would exhale into the pressure end and “spray” the engine.  Better them than me!  They were able to complete this job in one day for  350,000 mills (about $220).  What he said he couldn’t do was the bottom of the engine. Oh well. I know W/ and I can.

We borrowed some Ospho from Passport, and then set about to paint the bottom. I first wiped off any oil, then wiped with mineral spirits, then put the Ospho on any rust areas. Two days later I rolled and brushed paint on all the ares they didn’t hit. I had run out of the small amount of paint that Elvis had left so I had to buy some more from him. Oh well. At least now the engine looks “pretty”.

Go Slow
Sail Far
Stay Long