Whangarei

In many ways Whangarei has been; un-eventful, in others the events are more personal. We’re settling in here. We’re getting use to the “big city”, many restaurants, plentiful boat parts, a plethora of services, and all the necessities life has to offer. We bought a car, joined a gym, joined a tennis club and I have ended up with tendinitis in my knee.

Summer at Riverside Marina in Whangarei, New Zealand

Riverside Marina, Whangarei, New Zealand

 

The car came from another cruiser and previously from the used car place in Opua “Cars for Cruisers”. It’s a ’99 Camry which for the most part we are happy with. And the differences between the US and countries we visit are fascinating. In NZ to transfer a car title you go to the Post Office. The seller filled out a form (free) and the buyer (us) filled out another

Wrong Way, Wrong Side, Correct Pedals.

Wrong Way, Wrong Side, Correct Pedals.

with a fee of $9 NZ. Boom. The car is now ours. Every 6 months we need to get a service check called a WOF (Warranty of Fitness) and we are good to go. We have third party insurance for a year at approx $250 NZ. Of course this does not cover any damage to our car but it does protect others and by extension us. The car has a key lock where even with the right cut dime store key the car will not start. Yet, I am sure there are ways. The car has some minor issues we need to address. But it sure is nice being able to travel farther, faster, and carry more than we can on foot. Our US drivers license is good for a year. We expect to sell the car next Dec before our license expires. Hopefully to the next generation of NZ sailors.

 

Somewhere in our extensive walks I felt a little pain in my knee. I followed the recommended procedure RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression -lax

On our walk, a view of the town basin, Whangarei, NZ

On our walk, a view of the town basin, Whangarei, NZ

on that one, and Elevation). All was going well, too well as a matter of fact. I was feeling good and at the gym which we walked to I did a full body work out including jumping rope. My knee was a little sore. We tried a massage therapist there and it was W/s turn. My knee felt good. I figured I could walk back to the boat, ice my knee, drop off our gym bags, and return to pick up W/. About 1/2 way back my knee was talking to me. I slowed down and strolled on. On the boat I grabbed the ice and elevated it for 10 minutes. Time to return. I was in mild pain but hey! I am strong, I can handle it. Again at the 1/2 mark my knee started talking to me. Well, more like yelling at me. I actually took one step and sat down the pain was so bad. After rubbing it for a few minutes and figuring it was as far back to the car as it was to the gym I could make it. I was a man with a limp. But I made it. And at our fitness center an employee had some anti inflammatory meds. I took two. I would live. W/ appeared much too soon and I would need to walk again. But I hobbled to the restaurant where we met Lewis, Alyssa, and her mom for lunch. Had some more stories to share and then returned to the boat. I was now reduced to the speed of a crawl. Stupidly I didn’t want W/ to get the car. I could make it. Almost an hour later (normally a 15 minute walk) I was on board with ice on my knee. We got the IBProfin out of our medical kit and I began the descent into a pain free world. It was not to be. While I’m sure the anitinflammatory helped keep me from self amputating my leg I was NOT pain free. That night for me was miserable. My sleep would be best described as almost passing out. Finally the dawn broke and I returned to my rehab routine. Ten days later I am almost back to full motion and 90% of the time pain free. I look forward to Tennis this coming week.

The day before this major faux pas we joined a Tennis club. We had walked to Kamo, a nearby town that was only about 8km away taking about 20k steps to get there. That is where my knee began talking to me. But then it was in quiet whispers. We didn’t find the club but found the address of the club secretary. After a brief introduction she offered to give us a ride back into Whangarei. On the way she showed us two closer Tennis clubs. Anyway, we joined Mairtown Tennis. Five all weather courts (astro turf) with 12 tons of sand brushed in each court. Tennis balls they have, a ball machine they have, hoppers with balls they have; and all those included in the cost of our membership. They don’t have any clay tennis courts in NZ. The good news is that it doesn’t get slippery when wet and it is easy on the body. Not as easy as a clay court but much better than asphalt. W/ was able to play right away and I expected to play in two days as my knee was almost healed. That was until I abused it further. Now a week later I’m finally able to feed some balls to W/ and volley some. But running was still problematic. So I wait. I hope, hope, that this Tuesday I will be able to play with the Veterans (retired players) that play in the morning. Some things just don’t change. At Innisbrook and River Crossing (our old clubs) that was the situation also. (I have a problem here) One characteristic of NZ is our language differences. The language of the country is English but the words often have slightly different uses. W/ and I chuckle with every new one. Minnow; not a fish, a young boy or girl. Cheers! A way to say hello or goodbye and sometimes thank you. Kid Sharing; when separated parents have custody of children and they live with one one week and the other another week. Jandals; we call them flip flops. Stomping; more of what W/ does when hiking. Bach; a summer cottage and we don’t know where this permutation came from. Driving; we drive on the wrong side. Take away, a doggie bag.

With our car the most egregious thing we’ve done is hit the curb- twice. The turning ratio on the Camry is so different from our other cars I ran over a curb once and another time W/ brushed a curb. We tell each other to look right and stay left. That is our mantra driving. When entering any roadway; traffic from the right will nail us first and we need to stay left to avoid head on collisions. When leaving one place we had visited in the country I naturally took the right side of the road only to come upon a resident driving on “my side”. Fortunately neither was traveling at any speed and all I got was a smile and a finger wave not to drive on the wrong side. Whew! While we drive on the wrong side the steering wheel and driver is on the “wrong” side too! This makes life a further challenge adapting to the new perspective. Fortunately the accelerator and brake are in their correct positions but the indicator blinker lever and windshield washer lever is reversed. More than a few times have we indicated a turn by turning on our wipers. We are getting better at everything. Luckily we are not in the big metropolis of Auckland and the traffic isn’t hazardous to our driving, nor visa versa. I look forward to the time when while driving I can see a little more of the country side. Now I am focusing only on staying centered in the left lane.

Ah…the boat. Just to be clear we are NOT moving here. A few years ago immigrating to NZ would have been easier. Now the bureaucracy makes it quite difficult for retires to become permanent residents. Not that we would want to, we’ve not experienced a winter here and from what we understand Winters are not fun. Winter fun is in the S. Island. Thus we’ve been looking for a Home Sitting experience. During the winter months we hope to watch someones pet(s) and take care of their home while they travel. House sitting will solve our “freezing butt” issue. Thus if the water is close to 0º C (32º F) the boat will be ….. FREEZING! and if anyone has stayed on a boat during cold weather knows, it gets damn cold inside a boat. While you can warm the air up some, the water temperature becomes a huge heat sink. The boat temperature moves steadily towards the water temperature. Additionally we can leave the boat a mess while completing a few needed changes. We expect to haul the boat out of the water during this time.. staying on board then is not our cup of tea.

 
Go Slow
Sail Far
Stay Long

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